First Congregational United Church of Christ Proudly Hosts

Ford’s Theatre Society’s

The Laramie Project

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The Laramie Project presents a deeply complex portrait of a community’s response to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, a young gay man living in Laramie, Wyoming. In a series of poignant reflections, the residents of Laramie react to the hate crime and surrounding media storm with anger, bewilderment and sorrow. The play portrays the seismic and deeply personal impact Matthew’s death had on this small town while also demonstrating the power of the human spirit to triumph over bigotry and violence.

Fifteen years later, Matthew Shepard’s story still reverberates, urging us on with its clarion call to confront the destructive power of bullying and hate, in all forms.

 The Laramie Project has been performed more than 2,000 times worldwide. The Associated Press called it, “Astonishing. Not since Angels in America has a play attempted so much; nothing less than an examination of the American psyche at the end of the millennium.”

 The Laramie Project is the third offering in the multi-year Lincoln Legacy Project—an effort to generate dialogue around issues of tolerance, equality and acceptance.

Performances of The Laramie Project at the First Congregational United Church of Christ are

October 9, 10, 11, 12 and 15 at 7:30 p.m., and October 12 at 2 p.m.

Doors will open for general admission seating 30-minutes before performance time.

Tickets may be purchased online at www.fords.org or in person at the Ford’s Theatre Box Office (511 Tenth Street NW, Washington, D.C.). When Ford’s Theatre is allowed to reopen, The Laramie Project will resume as scheduled.

This performance will run 2 hours and 30 minutes (including two intermissions). Recommended for ages 13 and up. Mature themes, descriptions of violence and profanity.

For more information click here.

Click here to view “The Show Must Go On”  a video about the relocation of The Laramie Project.

 Photo by Carol Rosegg. From http://www.fords.org, 2013